Death Cab, Cutie, and Me

Ben Gibbard at Union Chapel

Ben Gibbard at Union Chapel

The first time I listened to Death Cab for Cutie I was 12. The O.C. Mix 1 began my musical education with the kind of indie bands that spoke ever so lovingly to the isolating feelings of entering teenagerhood. I took my pink iPod mini with me everywhere the summer I turned 13, and for the first time gave my life a soundtrack. This was only the beginning.

It was around 16 when I first saw a Coachella lineup. Death Cab was listed, along with most of the other bands I was listening to at the time. I didn’t know much about California beyond the wonders of Sea World, but I knew they were getting something right if something existed where you could see all the music you loved in one place. And I wanted to be there. My live music experience in Upstate New York was limited to a few outdoor amphitheater Dave Matthews shows, and one 18+ John Browns Body show for which I strategically convinced a stranger to vouch as my mother so I could get in. I knew I couldn’t stay somewhere with such limited access to music.

I was 21 when I first saw Ben Gibbard play live. He played an all-acoustic set in a beautiful church venue called Union Chapel in Islington. None of my friends had been excited by the idea, so for the first time I went to a show alone. I got there early and sat in the second row, listening to an episode of This American Life about what happened to military Dogs after WWII (or was it WWI?) until the show started. I started weeping with joy as soon as he started playing, and I knew the words to every song he played. It was magical.

I went on to see The Postal Service play that April at Coachella. I sat behind the Greek in Berkeley with friends to listen to them play for free a few months later. When Death Cab came to town last August, Lina and I saw them play at The Independent. We saw them again the following day at Outside Lands. We’re flying down to see them play their new album at the Hollywood Bowl this July. Ben Gibbard really never gets old.

I might say that Death Cab is to me what the Beatles were to my dad, but the Beatles are arguably the other greatest musical influence in my life. Death Cab has been there for me in my most formative years, and grown with me on my journey towards adulthood. This NPR article hits the nail on the head describing the impact Death Cab has had on a generation, and I encourage you to read it.

I suggest taking a listen to their new album. You never know what might strike a chord with you, wherever in your journey you may be.

Dear London

although sometimes its too cold for ice cream

Some things never change.

Dear London,

This past week has been an interesting one. I’ve been referring to it as being in ‘leaving-purgatory’. With the knowledge that I’ll soon be gone, I am neither here nor there. I will be sad to leave, of course, but having known that this day would come I did my best to not waste a second since I got back in October. I’ve made more friends, explored more new places, and spent more time walking that I ever though was possible in two and a half months. It has been pretty wonderful.

Sure we didn’t always agree on everything.

You were appalled when I brought a milkshake from one restaurant into another, even though I still intended on ordering food from said second restaurant. You think military time is easier, while I continue to find this preposterous.  What I considered to be the second floor you insisted was the first. You said trainers. I said sneakers. You said trousers. I said pants. You said pants. I said underwear. Sometimes things got a little confusing, but we always made it work.

Over the last (not consecutive) thirteen months I’ve come to appreciate your uniqueness. No other city shares such an immense love of fire doors, royal families and public drunkenness. No other city is so fearful of eye contact or so confused by that large burning mass that occasionally appears in the sky. I’ll never quite get the need to have five or more different types of solid milk chocolate in one vending machine, but hey, whatever floats your boat.

You’ve brought out some characteristics I never knew I had. I could probably join a circus with my acrobatic balancing ability learned on the top decks of your buses. I’ll always appreciate a good cup of tea, and I’ll always despise slow walking tourists and pigeons.

No matter where I go, I’ll always be a little bit of a Londoner.

Here’s looking at you, kid.

Cheers,

Eliza

Experiencing Online Community, Offline OR Why I Love Yelp

yelp life

I learned about the Yelp Elite community this past summer while watching Ligaya Tichy’s TED talk on rethinking startup communities. I was intrigued by the images of fellow Yelpers eating and partying together in cool venues. I thought to myself, “wow, this is my kind of community”.

I researched the qualifications needed to become a Yelp Elite in San Francisco, and discovered that it was extremely competitive with Elites having reviews numbered in the thousands. This wasn’t that surprising considering that Yelp originated in SF. As a newbie Yelper in SF my chance of becoming an Elite was about as good as my chance of reaching the intersection of Market and Octavia when the light was green during my post-work commute. So although I continued to use Yelp as a resource, I put my dream of becoming an Elite on the backburner.

When summer ended I headed back across the pond to spend another semester studying at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. Returning to my favorite eating haunts, I was inspired to get my review on. If you’ve ever started writing Yelp reviews while procrastinating then you’ll understand how addictive it can be. A few weeks later the Yelp London Community Manger, Alex Shebar, contacted me with an invitation to join the Yelp London Elite Squad.

Needless to say, I was pumped.

Though I was initially somewhat intimidated by the idea of meeting a group of strangers who were older and more experienced Yelpers than myself, I brushed my fears aside and attended the next upcoming event.

It. Was. Awesome.

Suddenly I was making friends with interesting new people who had tastes similar to my own, seeing parts of London I would have never otherwise seen, and best of all for a student: getting to try amazing restaurants for free. The worst part of the experience is that when I leave London in four weeks I’ll be leaving behind an amazing (growing) crew of Yelpers (who have promised to come do some Yelping with me in SF). I’m also comforted by the thought of meeting more Yelpers in Hartford while I finish my last semester at Trinity College.

In preparation for writing this blog post I rewatched Ligaya’s TED talk having now experienced the Yelp community first hand, and it blew me away. Instead of summarizing the points she makes, I’m going to include her TED talk here:

Looking at the Yelp community experience from this angle, all I can say is that everything Ligaya says in her TED talk is absolutely true. The genuine friendships I have formed through the offline gatherings of the London Yelp community have enriched my time in London like nothing else could have. I feel so lucky to have had this experience, and I will continue to advocate becoming active in the Yelp community to my friends, acquaintances, and readers. If nothing else, I hope you will consider getting out of your comfort zone and trying something new.

You never know, there could be free food.